How many days does a mother need to breastfeed a baby? What does the World Health Organization recommend?


Health | Written by : Suryaa| Updated:


How many days does a mother need to breastfeed a baby? What does the World Health Organization recommend?

Breastfeeding can help keep a newborn healthy. Naturally, available milk is very good for the baby. Breast milk contains a variety of nutrients. Breastfeeding not only promotes the health of the baby but also the good love bond between the mother and the baby. Medical experts say that breastfeeding also results in the development of the mental health of the child.

Benefits of breastfeeding:
Medical experts say the benefits of breastfeeding are even greater if the baby is breastfed for up to five years. The National Health Service (NHS) says that babies should be breastfed as long as they can. However, the NHS did not specify at what age to stop breastfeeding. Doctors recommend that the baby be exclusively breastfed for the first six months without any other liquids or solids.

Breast milk avoids Infection
Medical experts say that breastfeeding protects the baby from infections, diarrhoea and vomiting. Obesity and other health problems can be avoided as children get older. It reduces the risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the mother. The NHS website says that until the baby is two years old, it is best to breastfeed.

What about the World Health Organization?
The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that infants be breastfed for two years and older. Doctors at the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health in London say there is limited evidence to suggest that breastfeeding after two years may have additional nutritional benefits for the baby. It is claimed that by the time a baby is two years old, the baby will have all the nutrients it needs, along with other foods.

Is it good to continue breastfeeding?
Mothers decide whether or not to continue breastfeeding based on several factors. They come to a decision based on the convenience of breastfeeding, the inconvenience, the family members, the need to return to work, and so on. In Britain, almost 80% of women breastfeed for a few weeks after giving birth and stop later.